Tag Archives: potatoes

Lovely Roasted Potatoes

I love, love, love roasted vegetables from a pan.

And my husband is such a good sport.  I know he loves them, too.  Without fail, when there’s extras on the pan after we’ve all eaten some, I ask, “Would you like some?” He always replies, “I know how you love them, so you can eat them.” Y’all, that’s L-O-V-E.

In fact, the very first recipe I ever wrote was roasted carrots here.  And I wrote it out because I made it regularly, served to people, and they all said… UMMM HOW DID YOU DO THIS MARVELOUSNESS? (I know, not a word.)  So the truth is that the concept, overall, works for all root vegetables.

Lovely Roasted Potatoes - Foodies Gone Real

Come winter… we eat roasted carrots and THESE roasted potatoes at least once a week. Sometimes more often. Reasons are as follows, in order of importance:

  1. They’re freakin’ awesome
  2. They are SO EASY
  3. They are so cheap
  4. You can multitask (work on other dishes) if you please

And it bears repeating… they’re freakin’ awesome.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 6 small chopped hardy potatoes – think red, fingerling, yellow – NOT mashing kind (no russets!)
  • 3tbl+ Olive Oil
  • Dried herb of choice – 2tsp+
  • Salt & Pepper to Taste (my favorite part of the process, anyway!)

*NOTE: If you’re going to opt to use fresh herbs – which is an excellent choice! – I recommend reading the roasted carrot recipe here for measurements. It converts nicely to the roasted potatoes just fine.

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat your oven to 425*.

After your potatoes are washed and chopped, drizzle your 3 tablespoons of olive oil over your pan.

Dump your potatoes on the pan, and swirl, stir, etc… goal is to get them semi coated. If your potatoes aren’t all coated, add a little more oil.

A good dose of salt, pepper, and your herbs.  When you pull these out to test for doneness, you are also going to test for seasoning – hence the “2tsp+”.  Start with two teaspoons, and if you feel it needs more later, knock yourself out.  Our family’s favorite herb/spice for this is dried thyme. LOVE it.  Pictured here, though, I am using a combination of rosemary and thyme.

Stir/swirl again to coat all the potatoes with the spices/seasonings.

Lovely Roasted Potatoes

You’ll see here I’m baking them along with the Simple Mustard Chicken.  These two dishes go very well together!

Lovely Roasted Potatoes - Foodies Gone Real

Cook the potatoes for a total of 20 minutes, testing at about 15 minutes.  At the 15 minute mark, you’re going to use a spatula to turn/stir so the bottoms of the potatoes don’t over-brown. (Not that I mind the browning. Frankly, I love it.)  This is when you test the seasoning level.  If you bite into a potato and it’s crunchy… likely going to need more than another 5 minutes.  If it’s firm, or almost done, another five will help it evenly brown.

I don’t like to hold to specific times on recipes… it’s misleading for the following reasons:

  1. Gas and electric stoves heat differently
  2. Even different gas stoves heat differently
  3. The type of pan you’re using affects this. For example, a dark metal is likely going to brown it faster, stoneware (think pizza stone) might take longer, especially if not yet well-seasoned

So… you’re going to have to use a little bit of your best judgment here.

Lovely Roasted Potatoes - Foodies Gone Real

Once done… serve up, and serve up fast. Because, they’re worthy of it. But… just being real here… they taste just as awesome at room temperature. Or even cold. Yes… I’ve even eaten them cold out of a container from the fridge (on the rare occasions it’s not all eaten at dinner!).

Bon Appetit!

Lovely Roasted Potatoes - Foodies Gone Real

 

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French Fingerling Potatoes

So, if you know me, or if you’ve followed the Foodies Gone Real facebook page for any length of time … you’ve bound to run into my obsession with things FRENCH.

I’m a massive Julia Child fan, my long-term decorating goals are French inspired… and yes, I love French food.  (I had the great opportunity of visiting several times!)

You may have also caught my copy-cat recipe for Chicken Cordon Bleu.  (But just to be clear… it may not be legitimately French, but an American attempt at French cooking.)  This is my official side dish.

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If you see me in my kitchen, you might see me in my favorite apron from Williams Sonoma (the MOST durable and thick apron, ever!)

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You can use another potato good for roasting… like a hardy purple potato or red-skinned potato. (Read up on the health benefits of the varieties in this post).  We get fingerling potatoes yearly in our CSA share (Community Shared Agriculture) and they are tougher than the conventional russet.  In other words… these are not the potatoes for mashed potatoes at Thanksgiving dinner.

You should know that fingerling potatoes are considered an heirloom – they are not bred for mass production, but for taste and preserving older kinds of potatoes.

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First up,  pick your six fingerling potatoes chop them into bite-sized pieces.  This really just helps with the cooking all the way through.

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Melt 2-3 tablespoons of butter in a heavy pan.

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While the butter is melting, chop your rosemary.  You can sub in other herbs… thyme, tarragon will work well, too.

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Saute the potatoes and 1 tbl of fresh chopped rosemary in the pan, until the potatoes begin to turn golden.

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Add 2 cups of chicken broth.  Bring to a rapid boil.  Let them boil for no more than 5 minutes.  Cover, and let them simmer for about 20 minutes.

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The goal is for the potatoes to be fork tender.  The starch naturally in potatoes is going to thicken much of the broth into a super yummy sauce.  As in good enough for a spatula after dinner. ;-)

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Don’t mind my mismatch cast-iron.  You do what you gotta do.

After it’s thickened and potatoes are fork tender, salt the dish well.  I do not recommend a specific amount of salt as your broth will determine how much additional salt you might like. (And of course, saltiness is definitely a preference.)

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And viola! Bon Appetit!

 

Ancient Grain Lazy Chicken Pot Pie

It’s ancient grain because it uses Einkorn wheat, which is the “original wheat” (no hybridizing or bred for production.  It just is what it is.  And it’s GOOD).  I give quite a bit of information on why I prefer Einkorn in this post – my recipe for waffles.

It’s lazy because I didn’t bother with the crust.

Well, I bothered, but didn’t go crazy.

See what I mean?

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A) I didn’t make it in a pie dish – I actually made the pie right in the cast iron skillet.  So there’s only a top here.

B) I didn’t bother making it perfect looking. And point a) to this is… this was food for my belly, not for presentation.

I’ll add this in now — This recipe =  1/2 green, 1 yellow, 1 red for those on 21 Day Fix. Yes, I did the 21-day fix, and yes, I promise to post my thoughts soon. But for those on the plan now and watching what they eat… there ya go. :)

I grew up on stuff like chicken pot pie.  This time of year I tend to really miss comfort foods. I think, at least here in upstate NY, it’s because we’re inside, and you actually want to cook because there’s the side benefit of warming your home.  You want hot food.  I don’t tend to miss it so much in the summer – for me, this has to do with the amount of grilling I do.

But I digress.  Let’s deal with the weather at hand, and make a clean chicken pot pie.

TOOLS:
Cutting Board
Good Knife
Cast Iron skillet… I would go bigger rather than smaller

NOTE:
I ate a quarter of this in one sitting without guilt. So, if you’re planning on serving this to more than four people, I recommend throwing in some side dishes.

Also, you can cook the chicken and prep the pie crust ahead of time.  No real changes to the latter parts of the recipe are necessary if you choose to do so.

INGREDIENTS:

Pie crust ingredients (you can sub in your own recipe, but I recommend giving Einkorn a chance!) —
1 cup of Einkorn flour
4 tbl salted grass-fed butter
3-4 tbl water
sprinkling of salt

Innards of the pie —
1 1/3 cup chopped cooked chicken (I highly recommend going with dark meat! It will taste better!)
2 cup chopped veggies – what you have around will work
1 tbl salted grass-fed butter
1 cup milk
2 chopped skinned potatoes (about 1 cup)
2 cups chicken broth
lots of salt, rosemary, thyme, sage

DIRECTIONS:

Cook your chicken if you haven’t already done so.  Some families roast a whole bird and then pick off of it for other meals… this is a great option for this recipe.
I sprinkled my chicken with rosemary, thyme, salt and garlic and then roasted it.

I roasted it at 400* for about 35 minutes.  I wasn’t really worried about over-cooking it since I was going to dump it in a creamy-brothy pan later.

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While the chicken is cooking (if you aren’t using leftovers) make your pie crust.

Cut the 4 tablespoons of butter into the flour.  You want the pieces of butter pea-size or smaller. Sprinkle with a little bit of salt.

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Then, drizzle 3 tablespoons of water over the butter-flour mixture.  I would recommend using your hands to mix this together.  If you’ve made pie crust before with a food processor, feel free to do so.  I am without a food processor so it’s up to ingenuity to do without. :)

You want to mix it until it comes together in a somewhat dry dough.  Think play-dough.  You may want to add that fourth tablespoon of water if it’s really flaky or you can’t get it to combine.

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Cover it, and put it in the fridge to harden up.

Once chicken is done and cool, chop it up.  I used the breast pictured above and a few other pieces of dark meat.

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Chop up those veggies.  I used a tiny bit of celery, lots of carrots and onions.  I would recommend whatever combination you do with your veggies that you at least involve a little bit of carrot and onion for flavor. Chop up those potatoes too. (*Note: you can do without the potatoes, if you desire, and sub in more veggies. HOWEVER, potatoes help thicken up the “sauce” later, so I would recommend sprinkling a tablespoon of gluten-free, einkorn, sprouted wheat, or rice flour when you’ve combined the milk in a later step).

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Preheat your oven to 400*.

Melt some butter in your cast iron skillet.  A tablespoon will probably be enough if it’s a well-seasoned cast iron pan.  If you are not using cast iron, you’re likely going to need quite a bit more butter to prevent the veggies from sticking.

Add your veggies to the pan of melted butter. Throw a very hearty dash of your spices – I recommend dried rosemary, thyme, sage and salt.  You could add garlic if you feel so inclined.  Fresh is better, but this time of year I have no fresh, so dried it is.

See this picture below and about the amount I added?  Add twice as much.  (If you’re a visual person.)  The veggies and potatoes should be very covered in spices.  The photographer (erm… me) forgot to take the second picture where I added more. :)

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Let these cook until soft, adding more butter if the food starts to stick.

 

Once all vegetables are soft, stir in the two cups of broth and the chicken.  Bring to a rapid boil.

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While your veggies are coming to a boil, bring out your chilled pie crust.  It’s going to take a little bit of elbow grease to roll it out, but if your kitchen is hot like mine, choosing to NOT cool the crust means the butter starts to melt/soften which means a really sloppy and hardly-stick-together crust.

My preferred method of rolling out is between two pieces of parchment paper.  Roll it until it’s so think it’s nearly transparent (but no holes!) Then, once it’s super super super thin, you can slowly peel one of the parchment layers back.  Set this prepped crust aside, leaving it attached to one of the parchment pieces.

Go back to your veggies… by now they are boiling.

What’s going to happen next is this:  because it’s a wide pan, the water is going to boil off fast.  Keep stirring to prevent any sticking, and your potatoes are going to start to fall apart (only a tiny bit).  This is good because this is what’s going to thicken the sauce in the next step.

After it’s been rapid boiling for about 5 minutes and the liquid is reduced, stir in the milk.  Let it boil for another 2 minutes.  DO NOT LET IT BOIL LONGER THAN THIS. It will cause your milk to separate and turn the mixture a funky texture.  How do I know, you ask?  ;-) Let’s just say lots and lots and lots of failure in the kitchen.

Now turn off the heat, and slowly peel off your pie crust on top of the pan.

Remember… this is about appealing to your belly and not the picture.  If it’s sloppy, it’s ok.  This is a lazy pie.

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Slice through the top of the crust to make tiny slits.  This allows the steam to vent as necessary while baking.

Now, you can put your pie in the oven at 400* and let it cook for about 20 minutes.  This is mostly about letting the pie crust golden and the ingredients in the pie have time to stew.

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Next, your house starts to smell like heaven. And comfort. And yumminess. (How on earth do you spell that?)

You’ll know it’s done when the entire crust is golden, and maybe just a tiny bit brown on the edges.

I served mine with my favorite salad – blue cheese, walnuts, dried cranberries, and olive oil + balsamic vinegar.

My belly was soooo comforted!

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Tri-Color Sage Potatoes

I adore potatoes.  I blame it on my Irish-German (read: Texan) roots.  When asked what my favorite food is, I would tell you a baked potato smothered in butter.

I have since learned to love healthier versions of potatoes – don’t get me wrong, white potatoes aren’t awful, but the simple carbohydrates are just not something my body needs regularly.  (And the point is to eat nutrient-dense food – calories that COUNT.) Hence… tri-colored sage potatoes.

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Here are some perks for incorporating sweet (orange) potatoes and purple potatoes into your diet (aside from eating the rainbow!):

Sweet potatoes:  loaded in vitamin A, and less carbohydrates than its cousin, the white potato (carbs aren’t a concern for everyone … like my husband. His body type is such that he NEEDS carbohydrates in his diet regularly.)  It has lots of vitamin C (think immune support), and the nutrition gained from eating them can be linked to lowering blood pressure and helping with metabolism. (Sources: here and here)

Purple potatoes: fruits and vegetables that are richer in color (think dark reds and purples) have higher antioxidants, which means they fight off radicals that can contribute to/start cancer.  They’re also high in potassium and vitamin C.  (Sources: here and here)

So now that you’ve been given a biology lesson, here’s the recipe!

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 small purple potatoes
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes
  • 1 medium white potato
  • 3 fresh sage leaves
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat your oven to 425 degrees.

Thinly slice the potatoes.  I’m talking no thicker than a 1/4 of an inch.  If you have a mandoline, this will work.  If not, a good sharp knife.

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Drizzle olive oil on your baking sheet.  Swirl the potatoes around in the olive oil, then lay them out on the sheet as flat as possible.  Try to keep it to one layer (not stacked on top of each other) … but it won’t hurt a little overlap.

Chop sage leaves very finely.  I recommend stacking them one on top of each other, slice down the middle of the vein of the stem, then cut across the leaves.

Sprinkle the chopped sage across the potatoes.  Salt and pepper the potatoes generously, and give them another drizzle of olive oil.

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Bake the potatoes at 425 degrees for 15 minutes.  Bring them out and stir them around in the olive oil.  Test a sweet potato – it should be firm but not crunchy in your mouth.  Depending on how thick you stacked, you may need to put them back in for another 2-5 minutes.  If you don’t let them overlap much, they should be nearly done.

Also, keep in mind the type of pan you bake on changes how food cooks – very seasoned stoneware will cook it slower.  Shiny metal pans (or those covered in aluminum foil) will cook quicker.  I cooked mine over shiny metal.

When they were done… and cooled… I ate half the tray.  Standing up. Over the baking sheet.  Yes, they were that good.

I put my husband’s on a plate. :-)P1120328Ready

This recipe was featured on the Homestead Barn Hop.

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