Tag Archives: green

Washin’ The Laundry.

I am a little crazy about saving money (no really, I ramble about it here and here), and one of THE EASIEST WAYS is detergent. Just honestly, even if I could afford the most expensive green and clean detergent, I doubt I’d buy it.

Washin' The Laundry - Foodies Gone Real

It’s probably me and my fanatic brain on saving money, but there is SUCH a satisfaction I get when I make another batch of this. I haven’t calculated the cost, but seeing as buying all the ingredients costs me less than $15 and seems to last me forever, I gotta imagine it’s cents to do a load of laundry.  I’m also saving a ridiculous amount of money by using vinegar as softener (no really, it works! AND, it helps deodorizes naturally and cheaply!) and hydrogen peroxide as color-safe bleach.  Yes… as in the 99-cent bottle from the first-aid section of your store.  I line-dry, too (I love it, soooo much) as much as weather, time, and health will allow… and when not doing that, please for the love of all things that are good CONVERT TO DRYER BALLS.  Please, oh please, oh please do NOT use commercial dryer sheets. They’re nasty for you and the environment.  I have also been experimenting with a spray stain remover from Mommypotamus – the recipe is here.  So far, I’m loving it!

So, for the sake of posterity, here’s a summary of my laundry routine:

  • this homemade detergent
  • vinegar for softener (which deodorizes and helps break down the washing soda)
  • hydrogen peroxide for color-safe bleach, as needed
  • line-dry as much as I can
  • use dryer balls when I can’t line-dry

 

Washin' The Laundry - Foodies Gone Real

Here are the ingredients:

2 c washing soda

2 c borax

1 bar of soap, grated (this is where you can be picky)

1.5 c dye-free, fragrance-free oxiclean

30 drops Essential Oils (optional… current favorite combo is lavender, geranium, and sweet orange)

Washin' The Laundry - Foodies Gone Real

INSTRUCTIONS:

Mix together well.

For each load, I recommend two tablespoons. If it’s really gnarly stuff, or stinky, or muddy… throw in more.

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FURTHER NOTES:

Some people will make this into a liquid. I don’t bother because frankly, I don’t have the time. I’d rather spend that time canning on prepping some other food.  So I keep it in the dry format and it works BEAUTIFULLY.

Also… it does suds up. Not a ton, but it will. This is important to know if you have a front loader and/or high-efficiency machine.  I have both, and the suds/low-water has never been an issue.

BAR OF SOAP NOTES:

Washin' The Laundry - Foodies Gone Real

I love Trader Joe’s oatmeal and honey soap. It’s a four-pack and it’s cheap.  I grate it up and pull from as needed.

Now go suds up!

 

 

 

DISCLOSURE: There may be affiliate links within this post. I never recommend anything arbitrarily and receive small financial benefit. If I choose to recommend something, it’s of my own free will and volition and MORE because I think you’ll benefit from hearing about it more than me gaining the $$. 

Favorite Ways to Save Kitchen Bucks

So there are really only a handful of ways you can make real food work in a kitchen:

  1. Save money by making a lot of it from scratch, but it will cost you time
  2. Save time by buying real-food shortcuts, but it will cost you money
  3. Somewhere in-between the first two options, using both as you can (this is me, although I tend towards option #1)

I recognize this can feel daunting. And as someone who’s been at this for Y-E-A-R-S there are seasons in life – due to schedules, motivation, health, etc… that sometimes, this real-food-thing doesn’t seem possible, effective, profitable.

I am not above vacillating. We’ll go backwards. I’ll allow just enough cheats and junk in the house… and y’all, we FEEL it. Colds we can’t kick. Digestive issues that are awful. And of course, hormonal imbalances and weight gain. So while I, just like the rest of this planet, falls into it… I’m here to say a) give yourself some grace and forgiveness (and let’s not forget this is not about rules, y’all! So when there’s freedom from rules…) and b) encourage you and give you a few tools in the toolbelt.

Because sometimes, this wavering is because of money and schedules and not just laziness. (Disclaimer: sometimes mine is just laziness, so no judgment here.) You’re not sure how you can get this done and it just feels better to cheat. And cheat frequently. There are some basic skills that I feel keep me away from full-out junk diets AND still save money and don’t cost an exorbitant amount of time.

So…. If you’re wanting some easy ways to cut your costs in your kitchen and still get nutritious food in, here’s some suggestions….

Easiest ways (assuming you own a VERY basic slow cooker):

Cook your own beans. Buy them dried, and let them soak/cook in a slow cooker. After they’ve cooked and cooled, I freeze them in tupperware to thaw as needed.  I recommend this method as shared by fellow blogger and as I discussed in my recipe for Cajun beans ‘n’ rice.

Saving Kitchen Bucks - Foodies Gone Real

Oatmeal. Soak it and then cook in your slow cooker.  I detail my method over in my recipe for Pumpkin Pie Oatmeal… I wrote up how to do it for plain oatmeal, and then tacked on how I made it with pumpkin (which is really just added flavor at the end).  I usually make a huge batch, then once it’s cooled, keep in the refrigerator to reheat throughout the week. It’s super cheap and easy, filling food in the mornings. I don’t do pumpkin all the time (maybe only a 1/10th of a time?). Mostly, it’s just cinnamon + sweetener because that’s cheapest and easiest.

Saving Kitchen Bucks - Foodies Gone Real

Make your own broth. Of all my slow cooker methods, this is my favorite. Because most people just throw away chicken skin and bones and vegetable peelings… and this is using something you would ordinarily throw out! It’s like better than free! Haha. Shaye at The Elliott Homestead explains it best! I use this method ALL the time. I haven’t bought broth in probably over five years.

Make granola. Okay, so this obviously does not require a slow cooker, but an oven at minimum.  It’s easiest, though with a dehydrator (but please, oh please, don’t let that deter you!).  Method and recipe can be found here.

Saving Kitchen Bucks - Foodies Gone Real

If you have more time and/or right tools:

Make bread. I used to do this EVERY week. I now do this not out of obligation but for fun, and we buy our bread. This is a prime example of choosing to spend more money on something so that’s healthy so I don’t have to spend my time on it.  There’s loads and loads of great recipes out there, but due to my own gut/dietary needs, I rely heavily on Jovial Foods Einkorn Cookbook (check it out here… I raved about it in this post… and I still can’t say enough about it.)  It can be SUCH a rewarding experience, and there’s no taste or texture comparable purchased in the store.

Saving Kitchen Bucks - Foodies Gone Real

Make yogurt. This feels like a science experiment or chemistry lab every time.  It’s a pretty fascinating experience learning about how bacteria grows (or doesn’t).  I learned a great deal from The Prairie Homestead here.  I use a dehydrator, now, for this – but you can do without it. It does take some time and patience… BUT WILL SAVE YOU GOBS.

Make your own bars. Granola, larabars, fruit-n-nut, etc. I will confess I’m still learning this… in that I haven’t done as many.  Granted, it’s still cheaper to buy generic store brand granola bars… but don’t look at the ingredient list if you do. If you do, and want a cleaner option… then you’ll likely end up with an option that is closer to $1 (if not over) each.  I’ve collected quite a few recipes at my pinterest board here.  My current favorite are these blueberry bliss bars.  YUMMO.

Make waffles. This is no surprise to you, right? I’ve raved about waffles and the Einkorn recipe posted here is a top sought post. It obviously requires a waffle iron (special tool)… but you can get them inexpensively.  I usually double (sometimes triple!) the recipe and freeze 7-10 in bags so I can pull them out as needed, akin to the waffles you can buy at the store. I promise… THIS SAVES MONEY. Serious money.

Saving Kitchen Bucks - Foodies Gone Real

There are other options, too, for overall savings.

Overall stewardship of resources can make money spent in the kitchen possible, too.  (More info on that concept here.)  Here’s some other ways I save money:

Swagbucks. I earn swagbucks points on Swagbucks that converts into gift cards, which in turn gets used mostly for Christmas shopping.  Check it out here. I combine those gift cards with Black Friday savings (and other deals around that time of year) and make out like a bandit. No joke. With swagbucks and deal-hunting, the net worth of those gifts is often quadruple the amount of money I actually spent. I do not lie, I can show you the spreadsheets for proof! :)

Cleaning Supplies. I buy very, very little cleaning supplies. I have managed this between baking soda, vinegar, and Norwex.  Norwex products are mostly cloth-based and you combine them with water, clean whatever it is that needs it… and done. Yes, that simple. You wash the cloth and do it all over again. I use Norwex for dusting, wood, glass, toilet bowl, make-up removing, floors, just to name a few. Those are all areas of my home I’m not longer spending money on products that get consumed and I have to repurchase.  This isn’t even touching on the issue that there’s no chemicals and you don’t have to worry about toxicity.  Check out Norwex here.

Laundry Detergent.  I make my own … recipe forthcoming.  It’s a basic combination of washing soda, borax, dye-free oxiclean, bar soap (that’s been shredded).  There are loads of other options online.  I still buy some detergent, too… because we only have so much time. Sometimes, I need to buy it because I just don’t have time to make it and I’m running low.  However, it’s much cheaper to make it than buy a clean/green detergent… so it’s back to that basic choice of money versus time.

Reusable Bags for Snacks & Sandwiches.  I love, love, love these things.  They save money on the plastic bags, I’m no longer buying a consumable. I’m not contributing to the plastic-consumer-driven economy, either. They wash well with dishsoap.

 

So….

What do you do? How do you balance your time and money?

 

 

 

 

 

 

DISCLOSURE: There may be affiliate links within this post. I never recommend anything arbitrarily and receive small financial benefit. If I choose to recommend something, it’s of my own free will and volition and MORE because I think you’ll benefit from hearing about it more than me gaining the $$. 

Sarah’s Musings: 3/22/15

I didn’t post my musings last Sunday for the following reasons:

My family and I had been pretty sick the whole week before.  I wanted to just sleep in the extra time I had (that I would have ordinarily been working on this kind of post!).

Being sick, I wasn’t spending alot of time reading up on interesting topics, participating in facebook conversations, etc.

So I just left well-enough alone.

This last week was Saint Patrick’s Day (yay!), and if you’ll indulge me, I have quite alot to say on the topic… some food, some not, but still important valid.  (Is it socially acceptable to call your own words important?  This sounds too obnoxious.)

First of all, I am emphatic in teaching my children truth.  Call me whatever you like, but we discuss who Saint Nicholas really was, there is no tooth fairy, and specific for this holiday, we discuss why we honor Saint Patrick’s memory.  (I want to be the place of reason, and truthful answers, not stories that either a) manipulate them into good behavior and b) make them second guess if I’m telling them the whole story.  I’m sure I’m going to catch some flack for that.  And by all means, there is NO condemnation for the parents that choose to raise their children with these traditions!)

Another big part of this is my own culture and ancestors – we live in New York, where many of the ancestors of locals are Polish, Italian, or maybe even English/Welsh (if they arrived in upstate New York before 1900).  I love studying genealogy, and I am a child of two Texans – whose background is comprised of protestant (in the blood, man!), central-Texan German (from both sides), and a touch of Irish.  My maiden name is Irish, but protestant-Irish.  The difference is important to me, but not so much that I can’t appreciate Saint Patrick.  All of this leads me to be certain that I teach my girls the story on the real Saint Patrick – because it’s part of their heritage, too, and honoring to a man who loved Jesus.  (And due to the cultural differences and NOT being in Texas where their heritage is ALL OVER THE PLACE, they’re only going to learn this stuff unless I teach them!)

Saint Patrick was a believer, a changed man, who returned to the people who enslaved him to preach the saving message.  That message is that this world is a broken place, with broken people.  We can try in our strength to make it right, and to be right, but after we are long gone and called to give an account why God should allow us to a heaven, a place of perfection, we can’t say that we were perfect.  The wages of the imperfection, this marring of brokenness and sin on our souls, is death.  So in comes Jesus, who, being perfect and without fault, and fully God and fully man (that’s a mystery that even I have a hard time wrapping my mind around!), and dies on the cross and conquers death.  When we believe he paid the price for that imperfection, and choose to follow Him, we now have security – we have done nothing to deserve heaven and being made right with a Just God, but Jesus’ sacrifice covers that.

Patrick got that.  He lived in real slavery, with real sin, and real broken people.  He couldn’t leave these people alone, that knew no different, and had no justification before God.  So He returned, as a missionary, to Ireland.

So here is a day that honors this man: this man that loved even people that were not deserving of it, and by most people’s opinion, would have had every right to hold a bitter grudge against this people group for the remainder of his life.  (And the amazing thing is this – we should know of MORE stories like this!  Patrick is not the only missionary who ever loved a people group this much.  Look up Jim and Elisabeth Elliot, for example.)

So! We still do many traditions in our home – we wear green, I make green food, we eat a British Isles dinner.  But we also do this while discussing this great man who loved God and loved people.

Here is what was on our Irish menu:

Grain-free Irish Soda bread

Cashew Cream Mint Chocolate Pie  (I am still not over this pie.  IT WAS SO CREAMY AND EASY!) … pic here: https://www.instagram.com/p/0WA_5QskDT/?taken-by=foodies_gone_real

Cottage Pie (interesting fact: technically, you can only call it Shepherd’s Pie if it is made with ground lamb.  Since ours was made with grass-fed beef [for which I don’t have a written recipe! sorry!], we call it Cottage Pie.)

For more reading on Saint Patrick, check out this incredible article here.

I will leave you with my absolutely favorite quote, largely attributed to Saint Patrick:

“Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me,
Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me,
Christ on my right, Christ on my left
Christ where I lie, Christ where I sit, Christ where I arise
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me,
Christ in the mouth of every man who speaks of me,
Christ in every eye that sees me,
Christ in every ear that hears me.”

 

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